Althorpe School House S.S. #6, aka Tysick School

Althorpe School House S.S. #6 “Tysick School”

The hamlet of Althorpe officially came into existence when a post office was established in 1877 in the home of A. H. Norris. The post office and store served the farmers around Farren Lake, who were subsistent and added food to their kitchen table from their fishing and hunting abilities, and from their gardens, and the wild edibles in season.

As the hamlet progressed, Althorpe was served by a cheese factory, which does not exist anymore. We know that education became important to families through the existence of four other one-room schoolhouses in the area, at various times. The history of the Tysick School probably starts in 1916; as that is the date of our earliest administrative record when we see Ida & R.W. Tysick deeding a part of the lot to the School Board’.

School builder Nicholas Lennon signed and dated one of the building planks

Nicholas Lennon built the school, and as you can see here on the right, he has signed one of the planks in the building. He wrote: Nicholas Lennon, November 30th, 1916.

This may have been the day he installed that board or the date he finished the schoolhouse.1, 2

This next picture is what the schoolhouse looks like today.3

A drive-by view of the schoolhouse most recently

The following article appeared in the Perth Courier dated September 23, 1921: “The trustees of S. S. No. 6 have lately invested in a new flagpole, thirty feet high, and a flag which makes quite an additional improvement to the appearance of the schoolyard. Mr. R. Tysick who erected the flagpole has also been given the contract for the building of a new woodshed this fall, all of which is progress for No. 6.”  Mrs. Horrocks was the teacher.

Public Meeting in the Schhoolhouse
Meeting announcement

Since local schools were sometimes the only public building in the area, they were used for more than just education.  On November 28, 1921, the Honourable J. A. Stewart was holding a public meeting at this schoolhouse. It appears he was campaigning for an election that would occur the following week. His advertisement reads “A cordial invitation is extended to every elector including the ladies. God save the King. 4

In 1922 the school class consisted of seven children from three different families: Tysick, Fournier, and Dowdell. The teacher was Mrs. Horrocks.

The summer of 1922 saw the cleaning of the schoolhouse and its woodshed which included a coat of paint; the work completed by Mr. S. Renaud. Mrs. Horricks passed her examination in an agricultural course that she took during the summer, and returned to this school with new aspirations.  School resumed on September 15.. 5

Mrs. Horrocks

The school was suspended during week 2 March in 1923 because poor Mrs. Horrocks slipped and fell on the schoolhouse steps and sprained her ankle. Luckily, the steps were of wood.  Had they been of stone on cement, she may have hurt herself further. However, a railing might have broken her fall! W.F. Michell was the school inspector for the County, and building inspectors for townships were not popular until later on6 Right: A blurry picture of Mrs. Horrocks.

Students with the teacher on the school steps, Tysick family barn in the background

In 1953 the school had children from only four families in attendance: Tysick’s, Fournier’s, Noonan’s, and Norris. The teacher was Betty Miller. In this picture, you can see the Tysick barn in the background.7

The school was no longer used as a school beginning in 1956.8   It remained in the possession of the School Board until 1968 when it was sold to Joseph Thomson.

present owners Mr. & Mrs. Crawford

Nov 10, 2020 – Presentation Day – In this photo, we see the present owners Mr. & Mrs. Crawford holding their Tay Valley Heritage Properties plaque and certificate.

The Crawfords are eager to preserve our cultural heritage.  Photo by David Zimmerly.

Writer of this article: Karen Prytula

Source
1 Photo by Randy & Tammy Crawford
2 David Taylor research, land abstract
3. Google Maps
4, 5, 6 Perth Courier
7, 8 South Sherbrook School Book

© Lanark County Genealogical Society 2022

Beckwith Township Opens the Heritage Corners with its 1860s One Room School House

During Beckwith Heritage Day on June 8th, 2019, a special and exciting event took place. Beckwith Township now has a replica of a Lanark County One-Room Schoolhouse.

Robert McDonald, a well-known photographer from Carleton Place followed this heritage event throughout the various stages of construction.  LCGS opens our video highlighting this event with two of Robert’s photos that capture the schoolhouse in various stages of construction.

A special thank you to our President, for producing this video of memories.

Welcome to Beckwith Township Replica of a One Room School House

Now accepting Pre-Orders for “Recollections” from the Pen of Noreen Tyers

Cover of "Recollections" by Noreen Tyers

Targeted for release in the summer of 2022, (we are at the printers now!).

Noreen writes of her adventures vacationing in the 1940s at Richards’ Castle, Snow Road and her time as the “Pigtail Princess”.

A great promoter of the Lanark County Maple Syrup industry, Noreen has a series of stories for children starring Sammy Sap Man and his forest friends. As well she has written about life from the perspective of her little chihuahua Ruffy.

This is a lovely collection of stories from a time that many remember and look back on fondly from a lady who says she is not a writer, but a storyteller. Fortunately, this storyteller has written down her memories.

Writer, Noreen Tyers grew up in the 1940s in the Eastview section of Ottawa. She has authored many stories related to that time from her truly clear memories of situations and how she experienced life at that time. In her early adulthood, when her children were small, the family moved to a century farm in Lanark Township. This resulted in new adventures to write about as she learned to live in the country.

The price is $30 each, and shipping charges are extra. Order your copy in advance of the upcoming Book launch and come to the Launch for a signature by Author!

Over 25 years of Almonte.com

Brent Eades, created the first version of what is now the Almonte.com site back in 1995, a time when few people had home Internet.
One of the most popular parts of the site – going back over 20 years now – has been the ‘historic photo archive’.
Now numbering over 700 these photos of Almonte and the area start in the mid 19th century and were collected over years by Michael Dunn. They make up a visual history that few towns our size can boast, and I find them endlessly fascinating.

The Millstone is a community newspaper for the Municipality of Mississippi Mills

https://millstonenews.com
The Millstone is a volunteer-run newspaper for the Mississippi Mills area. Publisher: Edith Cody-Rice; Proprietors: Edith Cody-Rice, Brent Eades shares a number of genealogy and history research resources.

Shared by the Millstone News, 2022, for genealogists and historians alike.

Comba-Family-1914-1918

Soldiers sitting and standing

Soldiers sitting and standing

Will Cursive Writing be a Lost Skill of the 21st Century? Memories of those hours of practice

When many of us older folk went to school, we began to learn cursive writing in Grade 3. Every day we learned a newly written letter of the alphabet and then we practiced combinations of letters to improve this skill. The teacher wrote many assignments on the blackboard and we knew how to read cursive writing and copy our notes into our scribblers. The local fairs had printing and writing competitions for the best handwriting of a poem.

Those who attended teacher’s college in the 1950s were expected to complete assignments in large printing, small printing and in cursive writing for our English master. We had to obtain 5/5 for three weeks in a row or continue to practice until our instructor was satisfied.

The sentence that was used was:

“The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.” See sample

I never received more than 4/5 for my cursive writing as my instructor did not like the way I wrote – “br”.

This sentence contains all the letters of the alphabet and for cursive writing it contains some of the more difficult joining combinations such as “qu”, “br”, “ox” , “ov” and “zy”.

As a teacher, I had to learn to write on the blackboard and make sure our lines of writing were straight across the board. We often spent many hours lining all our blackboards with straight lines done with white pencil crayons.

A scientific study reported in “Frontiers in Psychology (Dec. 2020) looked at brain scans of young adults and 12-year-olds and found that cursive writing and drawing used brain areas that ”provide the brain with optimal conditions for learning”. This was not found when the subjects were typing. Other research studies have shown that cursive writing stimulates the brain. It encourages left to right movement, helps build neural pathways and increases mental effectiveness. This skill development aids the left to right progression needed for reading and fine motor skills. These are all important skills for children to learn. (New American Cursive, Iris Hatfield, 2007-2011, Memoria Press)

I taught my grandchildren to do cursive writing. When the company that my granddaughter was working for discovered her beautiful cursive writing, they paid her to sign and address over 300 Christmas cards. Both grandchildren have the ability to read old documents in cursive writing.

We have copies of several letters that were exchanged between John Gemmill (1774 – 1847) and Ann Weir (1781-1848) who settled on Lot 13, Concession 8, Lanark Township, Lanark County. These letters are dated from 1822 to 1832.

Here’s a sample of a letter John sent to his wife, who was still in Scotland, giving her instructions as to what to bring and telling her to get signed up with an immigration society.

Our family also has several original letters written to James S. Paterson (1793-1866) and his wife Mary Dumbreck Morrison (1794 – 1879) who emigrated from Scotland to Ramsay Township, Lanark County in 1821. Some of the letters were sent from Scotland and others originated from other places in Canada.

Note: Copies of these Gemmill letters and their transcriptions have been donated to the Middleville Museum. Copies of the Paterson letters and their transcriptions will soon be donated to the North Lanark Museum.

Will individuals of the next generation be able to transcript these old documents or will they have to hire someone else to do this work?

:: submitted by Frances Cooper

Now accepting Orders for Lanark County Routes

“Lanark County Routes”.

This is the newest book undertaken by Lanark County Genealogical Society.

Volume I Pakenham, Ramsay, Beckwith and Montague

Volume II Bathurst, Dalhousie Darling, Drummond, Lanark, Lavant, North Burges, North Elmsley, North Sherbrooke, South Sherbrooke.

Covers for the 2 volume set

Each volume has sets of maps applicable to the townships in that book. The maps are ones that have landowner names applied as well as one modern map with all the Lots and Concessions marked. These are designed to aid in finding where your ancestors lived.

The second component of each book is farm histories of various farms in each township as submitted by both members and by non-members of Lanark County Genealogical Society. Some farms are still active. Some are not. Some still have descendants of the early settlers on them. Others do not. While most of our ancestors did general farming, many farmers now specialize in dairy cattle, beef cattle, field crops, sheep, horses, etc. Along with these, we feature a lama and alpaca farm, a farm where sheep are milked. Some farms have become subdivisions. Many have more than one family living on the original lot.

Where possible we have identified the rural address of many of the farms to help people in situating where a particular Lot and Concession actually is. Many of the articles tell a brief history of the families who lived there in the early days. It has been particularly heartening to encounter several young couples taking on the challenge of farming at this time. We wish them nothing but success because our future depends on it.

Continue reading Now accepting Orders for Lanark County Routes

Now accepting Orders for “Lanark County Routes”

“Lanark County Routes” is the latest publication designed to assist people in researching their ancestors in Lanark County. Find out how to pre-order the two-volume set or either title separately.

Continue reading Now accepting Orders for “Lanark County Routes”

Accepting orders for Lanark County Legends

Lanark County Legends”.

The research and publication of this book were undertaken by Lanark County Genealogical Society. It is a celebration of the lives of over 80 people from Lanark County who made a difference. They were ordinary people who achieved extraordinary accomplishments. Some of them were people whose foresight built their community here in the County. Others left as opportunities presented themselves and went out to make their mark upon the world. This book has involved many authors and thousands of hours of research with references being carefully noted.

Continue reading Accepting orders for Lanark County Legends

Publication “Seasons in the Wind: Tales of Lanark County”

Lanark County Genealogical Society Announces their New Book “Seasons in the Wind: Tales of Lanark County”

This 300-page hardcover book is a compilation of stories from early residents of Lanark County, histories of various places in the County, as well as tales of the past.

Some of the surnames included in the book

Miller, Lawson, Boag, Archibald, Cole, Scott, Campbell, Barrie, Dunlop, Munro, Manary, Ashby, Richards, McCord, Stead, Robertson, Snedden, Gallagher, Symington, Clarke, Paterson, McArthur, Naismith, Morrow, Phillips, Allan, Godfrey, Craig, Walker, Shipman, Guthrie, McCreary, Davis, Ross, Shields, Cairnduff, Graham, McDonald, Gemmill, Mussalum, Hart, Bowes, MacDonald, Legare, Marks, Weedmark, Luteman, Mitchell, Dockerel, Robb, Moore, Annabelle, Morris, McPhail, Deugo

Continue reading Publication “Seasons in the Wind: Tales of Lanark County”

February is Canada’s Black History Month “HONORING A PROUD HERITAGE”

On February 2nd, 2019 local author Ron Shaw will present his research on two black families who lived in Perth between 1858 and 1926; the Gilberts and the Jacksons.

Ron is from Perth Ontario. He studied journalism at Algonquin College and worked for newspapers, radio and television prior to his 35 year career with non-governmental relief and development organizations in Africa, Asia, Eastern Europe and the Middle East.

Start Time 1:30 pm
Location, Beckwith Township Administration Complex
1702 9th Line Beckwith @ Black’s Corners Ontario

Event Organizers: Lanark County Genealogical Society